corruption

Whatever Happened to Clean Water Portland?

Clean Water Clarion


The Voice of Clean Water Oregon

Donna —

Whatever happened to Clean Water Portland?

We have transitioned!  Clean Water Portland was a political action committee, and as such, needed to be disbanded after the history-making 2013 vote that stopped water fluoridation in Portland.  Should another fluoridation vote ever loom, the political action committee can quickly be re-formed.

Some of the same folks from Clean Water Portland have transitioned the organization into Clean Water Oregon, a non-profit educational organization dedicated to clean water. Protecting our drinking water from fluoridation chemicals has a long and rich evolution in Oregon, with diverse organizations contributing over many years.  Without the time and dedication of prior organizations and individuals, our drinking water would not be free from fluoride.

We would like to thank the many individuals who have contributed over time to keeping our water clean, and for providing a foundation from which Clean Water Oregon can transition into an education organization dedicated to clean water.

Clean Water Oregon is a 501c3, which means donations are tax-exempt.

While we are no longer in the heat of a campaign, we still need to raise funds to cover operation costs so that we may continue to protect Oregon’s drinking water.

Please contribute online here or send donations to:

Clean Water Oregon

PO Box 14363

Portland, OR 97293


What is Clean Water Oregon doing?

After the 2013 campaign, Kellie Barnes participated on a City Club convened Children’s Dental Health Task Force studying alternatives to water fluoridation. The Task Force was comprised of persons on both sides of the water fluoridation issue.  The report recommendations can be viewed here:  A Path Forward for Children’s Dental Health

Now Kellie is actively advocating for a number of dental bills in the Oregon legislature that have the long range goal of creating more effective and attractive Oregon dental health programs than water fluoridation.

These bills have broad support of both those in favor and against water fluoridation in that the policies respect personal choice and also include best practices to improve oral health. Future issues of the Clean Water Clarion will have more information on these bills.

You will be glad to know that as of this date, we are aware of no one advocating for a statewide mandatory fluoridation bill in the legislature.


What about recent developments in the campaign for clean water?

Last week water fluoridation was in the news again. DHHS has lowered the recommended amount of fluoride added to drinking water for the first time in more than 50 years.

This reduction validates what we have been saying for years: recommended concentration of fluoride in water is not dose specific for each individual, and places the community at risk for harm due to unintended consequences of the policy.

Children of color are most at risk for fluorosis, the first visible sign of over- exposure to fluoride. CDC data demonstrates that children of color have two to three times the level of fluorosis as white children, including mild, moderate and severe fluorosis. Moderate and severe fluorosis are considered adverse effects due to over exposure to fluoride.

Fortunately there are better alternatives that are cost effective, such as topical fluoride varnish, which is 43% effective at reducing cavities.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12137653Topical fluoride also allows personal choice, and it is not associated with increased risk of fluorosis. The materials cost on average $2 per application, making it a cost effective preventive service for all children in our state.

The recent federal decision to lower fluoride amounts in water clearly demonstrates that better alternatives than water fluoridation exist, and that we should be advocating for topical forms of fluoride and dental access for all of our children, especially the most vulnerable.


Local News:

Nestle wants to build a spring water facility in the Columbia River Gorge town of Cascade Locks. Go to http://www.bark-out.org/project/nestle-water-bottling-proposal for more information.

The public comment period is open through May 14th through OWRD. website


The importance of clean water has never been greater.  We have a new organization and new momentum to protect our water. We look forward to your participation as we continue to keep our water clean.

 

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